What’s keeping you busy these days?
Testing my will power in physical and mental endeavours, and writing music and fiction. Also, reading. I read a lot.

What do you consider your biggest achievement?
I hope my biggest achievements are yet to come. Not that I take things for granted, but I see everything as a stepping stone. Still, I constantly remind myself to be grateful. Up till this point, it would be performing at the MTV Video Music Awards [in 2011] and appearing on the TV show Later… with Jools Holland on BBC2, in the UK.

What is your favourite place on earth?
India. And, I’m not just saying that. Many of my formative years were spent in India, daydreaming, discovering new music, writing, drawing, reading, exploring. India is rich with flavour and memories: going to the market with my older cousin in Mumbai, the smell of puris and my grandmother’s cooking, peacocks in Ahmedabad.

What do you constantly desire?
Intangible success. Unquantifiable and indefinable — a continuous thirst to evolve and move onward. It’s this madness that keeps me sane.

What are you searching for?
A good chocolate bar.

Which experience changed your life?
Just recently, my uncle [mother’s middle brother] died at the young age of 57. Although we didn’t see each other much, as I was stateside and he in Mumbai, we were very close. There was a connection between us; something greater bonded us together. His death has meant more to me than just the realisation of mortality, the fragility of our individual universes. The yolk has just cracked, soft and embryonic. Perhaps, in a few years, I will understand the shift it has caused in my life. Till then, I can only feel things slowly coming undone and forming once more.

What irritates you most about people?
Even the most learned man can get caught up in his own theories. It irks me when even learned people fail to realise how little there is that we actually know. In our capitalist, technological (man-is-god complex) society, we believe our opinions hold so much weight. This is controversial, but your opinion is as pitiful and powerless as a speck of sand. While mountains move beneath you, the ocean crashes above, whether you want it to or not. Maybe this opinion is as weightless as all the others it addresses; it isn’t for us to decide.

What one skill should every man possess?
The ability to sing. And, I think every man does possess it.

Who has inspired you?
My father, my mother and my grandfather — men and women who just had a grand idea to keep their families fed and warm, and who now look back on those days, having come so far. The immigrant’s story is the story of the underdog in a world of orthodoxy.

If you could live someone else’s life for a day, whose would it be?
It would be fun to inhabit the minds of the obvious: the rich and the famous, the talented and genius. But, wouldn’t it be more interesting to live the life of a schizophrenic homeless man on the street; the man you walk past every day on your way to work? Imagine how much more meaning the small fortunes you take for granted in life would have.

What are your biggest fears?
Failing; letting people down. And, I hate sharks.

What makes you happy?
A home-cooked meal prepared by my parents. And, spending time with my girlfriend in the precious time I’m not on the road.

What is the one thing every man should know about women?
They are the beginning, the womb. Treat them with respect because they are kind of the creator, no matter what religion or lack thereof you prescribe to.

What are your favourite memories?
Young the Giant’s first national tour across the US, our runs in Europe, Indonesia, Australia and the countless others that keep us trekking and able to fall asleep.

What resolution do you break often?
Although I promise, I always forget to call people back.