“We are living in a huge evolutionary moment regarding the concept of men’s and women’s fashion. That barrier doesn’t exist anymore, the fashion week calendar is responding to that reality,” said Carlo Capasa, head of Italy’s national chamber of fashion to AFP.

Capasa was, of course, referring to the scent of the feminine that wafted out of the Milan Men’s Fashion Week this weekend.  “Out of affection we are keeping the idea of still calling it men’s fashion week, but in reality, this barrier has already fallen,” he further added.

In a world that is increasingly becoming more accepting and open to the idea of gender fluidity and the idea of sexuality falling across a spectrum, the broad over-arching theme of the MFW seemed fitting.

Ermenegildo Zegna

The house of Ermenegildo Zegna kicked off the Spring-Summer 2019 lines and its collection fit beautifully with the architecture amidst which it was showcased. The monumental Palazzo Mondadori played host to the Zegna show with a mirrored bridge running the distance between the pools of the Niemeyer building, house to the Gruppo Mondadori headquarters.

(Credits: @zegnaofficial on Instagram)

Much like the architecture, the collection was all about sharpness, functional ease and elements you’d find in a contemporary wardrobe. The classic suit may not have been displayed on the catwalk but there was a brilliant mix of tailored jackets paired with slacks and track pants in materials like cashmere and silk.

Versace

Versace’s #SS19 collection was characteristically feral, rebellious, eye-catching and beautifully lethal. From tabloid print to the extra Gioielleria print, it was all about the man who everyone’s talking about. In fact, Donatella Versace said as much. “It’s about different kinds of men, the street style star, the high fashion man, the boardroom executive. He is a man who doesn’t care about the rules, he is not ordinary. He is a man who is looked at, talked about,” she told The Telegraph.

And look they will. The cult of #VersaceVersaceVersace is loud, fabulous, dynamic and as millennial as it gets. From every corner, the Medusa stares on and boy, are we transfixed.

 

(Credits: @versace on Instagram)

 

Prada

If the Versace man is loud, glamorous and all the rage, the Prada man appears to be elegant, intellectual and has scant interest in the latest meme or high fashion snobbery. Miuccia Prada is not known to pander to the masses. As High Snobiety reports, “her unpredictable, dense collections are the reason this is the most eagerly-anticipated date on the Milan Fashion Week schedule”. The trapper hat, tailored jackets, bootcut trousers and suede outerwear made up the collection and then came the boys in tiny shorts. 

(Credits: @prada)

According to High Snobiety, her collection was “more about people than impressing people”. Like the Versace show, the models made a statement here as well – just in a different way.

Dolce&Gabbana

The definite high points of the D&G show were Naomi Campbell, Monica Bellucci and Marpessa Hennink strutting their stuff in sharp and sleek men’s suits. The night-time versions of the brand’s classic suits were all sequins and gold embellishments. Sexy, sharp and impossibly beautiful, the collection was total glam. The ‘secret’ runway show featured the D&G Naked King Men’s collection which ranged from tight white briefs to satiny robes.

(Credits: @dolcegabbana)

Instagram favourites like Cameron Dallas, Nash Grier and Maharaja Padmanabh Singh were a few of the notable individuals to walk the ramp. “We are very lucky. There are not many designers left any more who own their own company. Most brands are all about the business, just about the business, and the real boss isn’t the designer, it’s the stock market. When you get into that game, things get very complicated. Nothing is done for the right reasons. But we still have the beautiful chance to express ourselves through our experience and to be curious about the future at the same time. We do it because we love it,” said Dolce, according to Vogue.com.

Overall, it is evident that the collections were aimed at the Millennials with the fashion houses focusing heavily on streetwear and clothing that works great for the workspace and the casual outings. Colleen Barry, writing for the Associated Press, states that focusing on office looks and streetwear using the same basic building blocks allows designers to cut across generations, geographies and income levels. We’ll just have to wait and see if it effectively does that.

 

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