Djokovic’s visa has been cancelled but the player will likely appeal against this decision

After a couple of nail-biting, tension-packed days, rivalling an Aaron Sorkin’s drama, it has now been confirmed that Novak Djokovic will be deported from Australia. The 34-year-old Serbian player was scheduled to play in the Australian Open which commences on Monday.

Also Read – ‘No-Vaxx’ Novak Djokovic’s Australian Open Dreams Dashed, Visa Cancelled On Entry

Australia’s immigration minister, Alex Hawke confirmed, “Today I exercised my power to cancel the visa held by Mr Novak Djokovic on health and good order grounds, on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so.”

This could also mean that the tennis ace could potentially be banned from entering the country for three years.

Now fondly referred to as “Novax Djocovid” the tennis star found himself in trouble when his visa was first revoked shortly after arrival in Melbourne. The Australian border force officials claimed that Djokovic had “failed to provide appropriate evidence” to receive a vaccine exemption.

He was later detained at the airport and was forced to spend four days at an immigration hotel. Later, Djokovic was able to get his visa reinstated by a judge, who ruled that the border officials had ignored correct procedure after his arrival.

Also Read – Djokovic Re-Arrested? Legal Drama Heats Up After Judge Orders Tennis Star To Be Released

In between all of this, serious allegations against Djokovic emerged, stating that he had made a false declaration on his travel form. It stated he hadn’t visited Spain in the last 14 days before his arrival, which he had.

Djokovic admitted that this was just a “human error” made by his agent, and it was “not deliberate.” During this media storm, he also confessed to meeting a journalist and doing a photoshoot, after having tested positive for Covid.

Keeping in mind the situation, it was confirmed that the Australian government will be cancelling Djokovic’s visa under separate powers in Australia’s Migration Act. This act allows for anyone to be deported, citing a potential risk to “the health, safety or good order of the Australian community.”

 

There’s a good possibility that Djokovic’s lawyers will appeal against the second cancellation in the Federal Circuit and Family Court as they successfully did after the first cancellation.

Meanwhile, we don’t know where the #1 tennis player is headed, but it won’t be to the closest vaccination centre.