Yesterday, I saw the first match between Kerala Kings and Bengal Tigers and I have to say it’s scintillating fun. I won’t be surprised if the format is picked up by international teams too, because the boom or bust nature of the game can help weaker associate teams win. 

Firstly, it’s completely different from T20 cricket. While T20, allows players to settle in and eat up a few dot balls if necessary, the same isn’t the case in T10. A run-rate of 10 might be considered very good in T20, but with T10 anything less than 12 rpo is shoddy. It’s like every over is a super over. Yes, you will see traditional stroke makers suffer but this format is perfect for viewers looking for thrilling and nail-biting moments, not well-timed and well-placed shots from the middle of the bat. 

In 2003, T20 cricket was tried by England county sides to attract dwindling viewers. The format seemed silly for purists, but now it’s the biggest of all three formats – at least in terms of revenue, thanks to the huge cash cow that IPL is. 

The same could be the case with T10 cricket as well, and I’m sure it’ll find its feet in the coming years. There was the Hong Kong super sixes, but it’s format was more like gully cricket with just six players for each side and every player allowed to bowl just one over. T10 cricket could be serious business, and there’s no reason why international cricket can’t have four formats if it can have three. Alternative sides are an option, and a team can play two T10 games in a day, meaning an entire tournament can be wrapped up in a matter of days. 

It’s supported by some avant garde players too, and here are a few that are making us watch the tournament. 

Shahid Afridi

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8uwRqZwmr8

In his debut T20 game, Shahid Afridi took a hat-trick for Pakhtoons. Indeed, he is a gift that keeps on giving. Plus, Shahid Afridi played T10 cricket in ODIs too, which is why he scored the fastest hundred long before big-hitting became commonplace. 

Virender Sehwag

His tweets might be inane, but as a batsman, Virender Sehwag’s gameplay was a treat for sore eyes. His performance in the first game was disappointing, but we are excited to see a few (or many) sixes from his willow in the upcoming matches. 

Eoin Morgan

If the England ODI and T20I captain is playing a league, it means that he thinks it is serious business. And we are way too below him as a cricketing authority to question his judgement. Also, he is probably one of the smoothest batsman in the tournament. 

Sarfraz Ahmed

In the first match, Sarfraz Ahmed who leads Bengal Tigers was extremely vocal and seemed to be pumped up as if it was a World Cup final that he was playing. His antics make the game exciting, and make us less skeptical about the format. 

Shakib al Hasan

One of the best all-rounders in the world at the moment, Shakib al Hasan’s involvement is another huge boost for the league. Though we think he might not be the most valuable player, his star value will light up the stage.