Here’s a look at the oddest stories to come out of Japan just this year:

Godiva runs a full-page ad asking Japanese women to stop buying so much chocolate:

Unlike the rest of the world, Japanese women are expected to give gifts to men. Chocolate is the most common gift, and Valentine’s Day is usually met with the practice of women gifting chocolate to their male co-workers. The custom is called giri choco, meaning obligation chocolate, meant to thank men for their support and effort in the workplace. Belgian chocolate maker Godiva ran a full page add in Japan’s widest read financial publication calling for a boycott of this practice, perhaps out of conscience as many women dread Valentine’s because of this practice.

Female feet flavored chicken goes on sale:

Sample this if you think sushi is weird. A Japanese takeout chain, Tenka Torimasu, has started selling chicken advertised to taste like a girl’s feet. The company promises that the chicken maintains the “smell and stickiness” of the real thing. The idea was born out of a collaboration the company had previously done with idol singer group Kamen Joshi, as they released a girl’s sweat flavored chicken. From anime to Godzilla, the rest of the world enjoys many of Japan’s imports, but something tells me this may not catch on elsewhere.

Hotel apologizes for one minute-long internet stoppage:

The five-star Palace Hotel Tokyo sent a letter to each of their guests apologizing for a minute-long internet stoppage that took place at four in the morning. Truly taking eastern hospitality to the next level.

Public school demands $700 Armani uniforms:

A public elementary school in one of Japan’s richest areas made news for introducing a new uniform for the school year: one that cost roughly $700 and was made by Armani. The school stated that the institution was a landmark and the uniforms were chosen to reflect the atmosphere of the school. One wonders what the atmosphere must be like at a school with nine year-olds wearing uniforms costing over forty thousand rupees.

Bitcoin-themed pop group goes viral:

Japan loves its pop groups. These artists are referred to as ‘idols’ because of the level of public fanfare they receive. One group has stood out for each of its eight members representing a different cryptocurrency. They sing about cryptocurrency, each wear masks representing a different currency, and all of their merchandise can only be purchased in crypto. They say their aim is to educate the public about cryptocurrency. The digital age, indeed.