Badrinath Ki Dulhania has finally made its way to the theatres and there’s a lot of positive buzz surrounding the film. Directed by Shashank Khaitan and starring Alia Bhatt and Varun Dhawan, this romantic comedy is garnering a lot of accolades for the effortless chemistry between the two leads.

So if you’re gearing up to watch the film this weekend, here’s a round-up of what the critics have to say. Take a look.  

Times of India

“Together, Varun Dhawan and Alia Bhatt are the best thing that could have happened to our screens. The beautiful effortlessness of their onscreen companionship plasters a grin on your face. Dhawan as Badri is adorable; you instantly take to him. He even pulls off some high-drama scenes impressively. Bhatt, unsurprisingly, gives it her all, and her sincerity comes through. But her accent, casually swinging between Juhu and Jhansi, is bothersome at times.

RSVP Yes to this wedding; it’s grand, with good music, great people and delicious food for thought.”

Indian Express

“The challenge of any rom-com is to get past its predictable beats. The setting lends the film freshness. So does the lead pair, whom we’ve seen in the same boat in Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhaiya: in this second instalment of what looks like a franchise, they are sharper, more vivid, and better attuned to each other.”

Hindustan Times

“What stands out is Khaitan’s understanding of comic elements in a light-breezy romance. He keeps breaking the monotony with situational comedy. It also envelopes Dhawan’s flawed dialect.”

NDTV

This definitely won’t go down as a match made in heaven. Badrinath Ki Dulhania is a pulpy, uneven romantic caper that strives to pass itself off as a mellow tale of patriarchy, love, honour and ambition set in small-town India and couched in doses of humour. Neither the mush nor the air of mirth can pull it out of the trough it digs for itself. Writer-director Shashank Khaitan’s overly cheerful follow-up to 2014’s Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania pulls off only a part of the exercise. The rest – comprising protracted swathes of the film – is at best glossed-up dross. The attempted marriage of frivolity and matters solemn isn’t a happy one. Badrinath Ki Dulhania, produced by Karan Johar’s Dharma Productions, is replete with all the stock conceits of the genre even as it tries to seek out a fresh trajectory.

Firstpost

“While there are several obvious ones (including one scene in which Vaidehi saves Badri from being molested) the main one is this — we’ve seen so many movies where a man enables a woman to achieve her potential or to gain her goals, be it Chak De, Dangal, Pink or others. But in Badrinath ki Dulhania, it is a woman (Vaidehi) who enables a man (Badri) to grow, and become a better, egalitarian individual.

Varun Dhawan makes good use of the trajectory offered to him by the plot — and although his accent slips between small-town lad and Mumbai tapori from time to time, he delivers a very lovable protagonist.”

DNA

“Despite being light and breezy, BKD has some heavy duty scenes that allow Varun and Alia to showcase their acting chops. Both have already established their versatility in different genres, which makes their performances in BKD even more endearing. As the naive, bumbling village buffoon in the first half Varun engages you with his goofiness. It doesn’t take him too long to change gear and show his serious side in the second half as the narrative takes a dramatic turn. Badri is a likeable guy and Varun goes all out to ensure we are by his side. His comic timing with his sidekick (Sahil Vaid) is as good as his chemistry with Alia in the romantic scenes. Varun’s restraint in the climax scene is worth a applause, when he could have easily succumbed to the temptation of going all out and making it caricaturish. Alia is her usual self, which means she’s damn good! Be it her accent or scenes with Varun, she proves yet again why she can take on any role and make it her own.”