WORK UP SOME STEAM

“How do I keep my suits clean?’ we hear you ask. A steamer is your best friend, because it’s the best way to smoothen out wrinkles as well as to deodorise — it doesn’t cost very much, either. You don’t need to steam the chest area that much, as it usually doesn’t wrinkle. Pro tip: if you’re travelling and don’t have access to a steamer, hang up the suit in your hotel room’s bathroom while taking a hot shower — the steam should sort out any wrinkles. Don’t use a regular iron on a suit, as it will damage the wool and cause it to shine (and not in a good way). If you need to do this, put a cloth of some sort on top of the suit fabric and then iron it.

(NOT) TAKING IT TO THE CLEANERS

Unless you’ve upended your dinner all over your suit, it’s best not to send it to a dry cleaner. The process involves the use of chemicals that are quite harsh, so if you dry clean a suit frequently, it will damage the fabric — especially if it’s of a higher micron number. Dry clean your suits twice a year at most, and if there are stains on them, have only that section cleaned.

HANG TIME

Hang your suits on good quality wooden hangers — this will help maintain their shape, especially around the shoulders. Hang them away from other clothes, in order to give them space to air out.

BRUSH IT OFF

Invest in a good suit brush, as well as a lint roller. Wool is a fabric that accumulates dirt, lint and the like, so it needs regular, gentle brushing, preferably after every use. Brush downwards from the jacket, beginning at the shoulders.

CARRY LESS

Filling the various pockets of your suit with stuff does two things — it affects the silhouette and, over time, the shape of the suit. Pack light, as it were.

PLASTIC (NOT SO) FANTASTIC

The plastic cover in which your new suit comes should be discarded. Over time, plastic begins to give off fumes, which can damage the suit.

BAG IT

If you’re not using suits on a regular basis, store and hang them in a properly ventilated garment bag.