Gaming fans across the world have been asking for a Max Payne reboot for more than a decade now, and it looks like our prayers have been answered. In a recent press release issued by Remedy Entertainment, the creators of the third-person shooter, it is now been confirmed that Max Payne 1 and Max Payne 2 are headed for a remake. 

The company also confirmed that it has signed a development agreement with Rockstar, the original publisher of the series. However, while Rockstar will still be providing the necessary financial backing, the remakes will not be done by Remedy alone. While there’s no official timeline yet, the company has confirmed that both the games are “currently in the concept development stage.”

Our excitement right now is unparalleled. Many of you new gamers may not know about the impact the Max Payne series had on the gaming world. So today, we’ve decided to take a look at why this third-person shooter so iconic. 

Bullet-time! 

Remember the slow-mo action sequence in Matrix? Wouldn’t it be cool to experience it yourself? This is exactly what folks at Remedy might’ve been thinking before introducing bullet-time in Max Payne

The result of which is spectacular. Throughout three games, you get dozens and dozens of opportunities to do a hell of a lot of slow-motion shooting, but surprisingly it never gets old. The whole notion of launching yourself forward in slow-motion while enemies hurl bullets at you feels like you’re the chosen one and not Neo. 

The Gameplay

At its core, the Max Payne series is still a shoot-’em-up action-adventure (which means, it is possible to clear out a room of bad guys all by yourself), but sometimes it does feel like a puzzle game. You try to figure out the quickest way to escape a building, find a way across it, or just try to figure out the most efficient and ruthless way to clear a room based on the weapons you’re carrying. 

And while the enemy AI does feel dated now, the over-the-top New Jersey accents of the wise-cracking gangster make up for some entertaining encounters. Add in the sound of shell casings hitting the floor during a battle, with Max’s dry one-liner on top of it and you are living the life of an ’80s action hero.

Our very own John Wick

But it isn’t all fun and games throughout. At its core, the story of Max Payne is dark and tragic. We are out for revenge, after the death of Max’s wife and newborn child. As we follow him on his journey, the story is told through the medium of a comic-book style storyboard, with Max’s grizzly voice narrating us throughout. Not to mention, the sombre score used in the background makes it more immersive. The whole setup feels extremely unique and unlike anything that is on offer today. 

The Backdrop 

All three Max Payne games do a phenomenal job of creating an atmosphere. In the first game, for instance, New York seems dark and dreary, much like the character we play. The whole city feels mythical in a way, which again alludes to Max’s fractured psyche. 

Here we are taken on a tour of dilapidated apartment blocks, fleabag hotels, and seedy nightclubs, each more depressing than the other. But that’s not a bad thing. It showcases the strength of its art direction and its use of light and shadow. No wonder most of its visuals still hold up to this day.